This blog is a bit of a ramble through my life. There's a lot about quilting and textile arts, a sprinkle of my family life and some of my thoughts and ponderings. We currently live aboard an old wooden 1945 Navy boat, called MV Cerego, so you'll find me writing about that too. Welcome aboard!

Monday, March 12, 2018

Getting There

I finally feel like I'm getting on top of moving house.  We were pretty spread out - things on the boat, things at my studio, a few things at my mother in law's house.  And to try and get all those things into one apartment took a lot of sorting, throwing out, donating and consolidating.

Slowly but surely things are coming together.  And they seem to happen one corner at a time.  Which is why I'm showing you my kitchen nook and not my studio.  Because although I'm starting to sew again (yay! it feels great) the studio corner not quite photoshoot ready, but the kitchen nook is close enough done.  Last night, hubby and I made and installed the shelf from some old rimu timber we found in the attic (don't worry, landlord was cool with it).  It's doing those little things that are making it into a place we can call home.

It's a rainy day outside.  Ex-cyclone Hola is making her appearance.

The building we are living in is a Heritage Listed building (you can check out a 1915 photograph of her here.)  Which is pretty neat and also means that it has slight oddities.  Like the funny shaped 'window' above my kettle.  The toaster and tea tins sit into a recessed cupboard and then there is a weird little triangle shaped hole above it.  The hole looks into the storage cupboard that we fondly call the man cave, because it's housing the man's tools etc.  But what is the window for?  It has no glass, it's just a hole.

In the photo above, you can see it at the far side when you're looking into the man cave.  Apologies for the 'in the raw' photo, but it's a storage cupboard, it's never going to look pretty!  The triangle shape is because of the roof.  We are living on the top floor and so have sloped ceilings at either side of the house.  These little oddities are making this move fun.  And I guess, in a way, making the transition from living in the boat, with all her weird and wonderful corners, to living in a conventional house again, a little easier.

If anyone is interested in the little town where I live, you can visit this website here.  It's put together by Julie, a local photographer, who can often be seen wandering the streets with her camera.  She has included local history as well as current images.  There are some great up to date photographs of the building I live in too.